HepCBC Mission Statement

HepCBC is a non-profit organization run by and for people infected and affected by viral hepatitis. Our mission is to provide education, prevention and support to those living with viral hepatitis.

The Week in Review: Oct 5 – Oct 19, 2018

Physicians and NPs in British Columbia Currently Treating Hepatitis B and/or Hepatitis C

Hot Off The Press!

The Week in Review: Oct 5 – Oct 19, 2018

Friday, Oct 19, 2018 News Recap: Want a Say in the Direction of HepCBC? Online or in person, attend HepCBC's Annual General Meeting. Actual event is Saturday, November 3rd from 2 to 3 pm. 1947 Cook Street. UC researchers recommend universal screening to tackle rise in Hepatitis C. Physicians are encountering a growing number of younger patients who are testing positive for hepatitis C virus (HCV) fueled largely by the opioid crisis impacting com...

Want a Say in the Direction of HepCBC?

Online or in person, attend HepCBC's Annual General Meeting. Actual event is Saturday, November 3rd from 2 to 3 pm. 1947 Cook Street, Victoria if in person (the main Victoria Health Unit, in the main Meeting Room). Public welcome, but only registered Members can vote. Members: watch your email box for an invitation with links to the online meeting and election! If you are a Member and do not receive your invitation  by Sunday (18th), notify HepCBC

UC researchers recommend universal screening to tackle rise in Hepatitis C

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI ACADEMIC HEALTH CENTER -- Physicians are encountering a growing number of younger patients who are testing positive for hepatitis C virus (HCV) fueled largely by the opioid crisis impacting communities around the country. That increase and more effective and tolerable drug regimens for HCV infection, means one-time universal screening of all adults for HCV is now cost effective and recommended, say physician-researchers in the Univ

Does Cannabis Use Reduce Cirrhosis Risk in HCV Patients?

In an observation of a large pool of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV), cannabis users had a lower prevalence of liver cirrhosis, more favorable health status at hospital discharge, and lower total health care costs than non-users. Adeyinka Adejumo, lead author of the study and graduate student at the University of Massachusetts Intercampus Program in Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology, and colleagues indicated the findings add to a relationship