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HepCBC is a non-profit organization run by and for people infected and affected by hepatitis C. Our mission is to provide education, prevention and support to those living with HCV.

The Best of the Week to You: Nov 10 - Nov 17, 2017

Hot Off The Press!

The Week in Review: November 10 – November 17, 2017

Friday, November 17, 2017 News Recap: AASLD 2017 HCV Clinical Guidelines and Patient Management highlights from The Liver Meeting 2017. Thanks to the Canadian Society for International Health we are able to share this excellent presentation, by Dr. Curtis Cooper, on highlights from AASLD 2017. Liver Cancer Global Perspectives on Hepatocellular Carcinoma.  Be sure to check out this excellent article! A panel of international oncology experts rece...

HCV Clinical Guidelines and Patient Management highlights from The Liver Meeting 2017

Please find the attached HCV Clinical Guidelines and Patient Management highlights from The Liver Meeting® hosted by The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases in October 2017, in Washington D.C. The presentation was prepared by Dr. Curtis Cooper, Director of The Ottawa Hospital and Regional Viral Hepatitis Program ccooper@toh.ca, please contact Dr. Cooper if you have any questions. Click on Image to view PDF Ecaterina Perean Damian, MPH,

Global Perspectives On Hepatocellular Carcinoma

A panel of international oncology experts recently met to exchange thoughts on developments in the field of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer. They discussed screening and staging issues, treatment of advanced HCC and results of recent clinical trials. Treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer, is exceptionally challenging today. Even as new therapies are on the horizon that show some

Liver test to aid paracetamol overdose treatment

People who overdose on paracetamol (acetaminophen) could be helped by a blood test that shows immediately if they are going to suffer liver damage. Researchers in Edinburgh and Liverpool said the test would help doctors identify which patients arriving in hospital need more intensive treatment. The blood test detects levels of specific molecules in blood associated with liver damage. The three different molecules are called miR-122, HMGB1 and FL-K18