HepCBC Mission Statement

HepCBC is a non-profit organization run by and for people infected and affected by hepatitis C. Our mission is to provide education, prevention and support to those living with HCV.

Hot Off The Press!

The Week in Review: April 21, 2017 – April 28, 2017

Friday, April 28, 2017 News Recap Canada New Canadian Testing Guidelines Released: On April 24, 2017, The Canadian Task Force on Preventative Health Care (CTFPHC) published its HCV Screening Guidelines in the CMAJ. The guidelines make the recommendation to continue screening those with known risk factors, but does not include a recommendation to screen the age cohort born between 1945-1975, which has been recommended by many of Canada’s top liver sp...

First U.S. state-by-state analysis of hepatitis C cases

In the infectious disease world, the liver-damaging hepatitis C virus (HCV) long has lived in the shadows of killers such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. But curative—and expensive—HCV drugs that have come to market over the past 5 years have focused new attention on the deadly disease. Now, for the first time, researchers have mapped its U.S. prevalence state-by-state. They hope their model ultimately will help improve targeting of efforts to s...

Hepatitis C documentary sheds light on best practices

VANCOUVER – To launch National Aboriginal Hepatitis C Month in May, the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN) is proud to release, Promising Practices in Timiskaming First Nation, the second film in a series of documentaries which showcase community-led initiatives and the power of storytelling to improve health outcomes. This time the camera lens focuses on tackling Hepatitis C with culturally appropriate practices as Indigenous People in Canada are

AHC Letter: Baby boomers not included in task force guidelines for hepatitis C screening

The Canadian Task Force on Preventative Health Care (CTFPHC) released its HCV Screening Guidelines today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. The guidelines make the recommendation to continue screening those with known risk factors, but does not include a recommendation to screen the age cohort born between 1945-1975. This news article quotes the head of the working group for these guidelines: “What we are saying is that people who a...