The Week in Review: April 21, 2017 – April 28, 2017

Friday, April 28, 2017 News Recap Canada New Canadian Testing Guidelines Released: On April 24, 2017, The Canadian Task Force on Preventative Health Care (CTFPHC) published its HCV Screening Guidelines in the CMAJ. The guidelines make the recommendation to continue screening those with known risk factors, but does not include a recommendation to screen the age cohort born between 1945-1975, which has been recommended by many of Canada’s top liver sp...

First U.S. state-by-state analysis of hepatitis C cases

In the infectious disease world, the liver-damaging hepatitis C virus (HCV) long has lived in the shadows of killers such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. But curative—and expensive—HCV drugs that have come to market over the past 5 years have focused new attention on the deadly disease. Now, for the first time, researchers have mapped its U.S. prevalence state-by-state. They hope their model ultimately will help improve targeting of efforts to s...

Hepatitis C documentary sheds light on best practices

VANCOUVER – To launch National Aboriginal Hepatitis C Month in May, the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN) is proud to release, Promising Practices in Timiskaming First Nation, the second film in a series of documentaries which showcase community-led initiatives and the power of storytelling to improve health outcomes. This time the camera lens focuses on tackling Hepatitis C with culturally appropriate practices as Indigenous People in Canada are

AHC Letter: Baby boomers not included in task force guidelines for hepatitis C screening

The Canadian Task Force on Preventative Health Care (CTFPHC) released its HCV Screening Guidelines today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. The guidelines make the recommendation to continue screening those with known risk factors, but does not include a recommendation to screen the age cohort born between 1945-1975. This news article quotes the head of the working group for these guidelines: “What we are saying is that people who a...

Generic hepatitis C drugs continue to produce high cure rates

Treatment with generic versions of direct-acting antiviral drugs continues to produce similar cure rates to those reported in clinical trials, Dr James Freeman reported last week at the International Liver Congress in Amsterdam. Dr James Freeman, an Australian general practitioner based in Hobart, Tasmania, was reporting on the outcomes of people with hepatitis C who imported generic versions of direct-acting antivirals manufactured in India and elsewhere

Baby boomers not included in task force guidelines for hepatitis C screening

TORONTO -- The average Canadian adult does not need to be screened for infection with hepatitis C, a blood-borne virus that can in time cause cirrhosis or cancer of the liver, says a task force that develops practice guidelines for primary-care providers. "Population-based screening should be reconsidered in light of price reductions for DAAs, as well as emerging evidence on HCV transmission and long-term health outcomes after treatment." In its first he

AbbVie takes aim at Gilead and BMS with 8-week hep C treatment

AbbVie is aiming to steal sales from hep C drugs from Gilead and BMS with a new combination offering a shorter, eight-week treatment for the most difficult-to-treat form of the disease. Results presented at the International Liver Congress (ILC) in Amsterdam showed 95% of genotype 3 patients on its pan-genotypic regimen of glecaprevir+pibrentasvir were free of disease, 12 weeks after completing an eight-week treatment course. The results were based on

Canadian task force rejects calls for widespread hepatitis C-testing

New hepatitis C screening guidelines will lead to avoidable deaths and soaring costs to health care system. Reliance on risk-based testing will perpetuate low diagnosis rates and increases in cirrhosis and liver cancer TORONTO, April 24, 2017 /CNW/ - They may not look sick. They may not feel sick. And yet many Canadians in the prime of their lives are living with a potentially fatal liver disease -- hepatitis C. An estimated 44 percent of Canadians with

MicroRNA-34a as a Therapeutic Target in HCC

MicroRNA-34a, one of the most documented tumor suppressor microRNAs, is being evaluated as a potential therapeutic target in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a study being presented at the 2017 International Liver Congress. Results from a study of microRNA-34a and natural killer (NK) cells suggest that microRNA-34a could have a role in regulating cytotoxicity and development of the effector NK cells and their target cells. Lead author Amira Abdelhamid