The Week in Review: September 15 – September 22, 2017

Friday, September 22, 2017 News Recap: Access to Treatment: This was a good week in terms of treatment access (but not, unfortunately, in terms of weather or seismic activity: How very, very sad).  Imagine being sick or on treatment in one of these stricken areas! In Canada Epclusa was approved for use in persons co-infected with HIV. This is very good news. Gilead Receives Approval in Canada for Expanded Indication of EPCLUSA® (Sofosbuvir/Velpat...

Malaysia Allows Generics for Gilead’s Hepatitis C Drug for Which India Issued Patent

The Malaysian government has approved a government-use compulsory license which would allow the import of generic versions of Gilead’s patented hepatitis C drug, Sovaldi. The decision was made in August but has become public this week. On September 14, the Malaysian cabinet approved for this license. The move will make generic and cheaper versions of the same drug, which has been sold globally at $1000 per pill. The low-cost versions will now be available

The Week in Review: April 28, 2017 – May 5, 2017

Friday, May 5, 2017 News Recap Canada Great news from Nova Scotia: Expanded access to and coverage for treatment of chronic hepatitis C is now available under the provincial Pharmacare plan, similar to the new arrangements in BC, Alberta, Ontario, Saskatchewan and Quebec.  The drugs covered are: Epclusa, Daklinza, Sunvepra, Zepatier, Harvoni and Sovaldi. You can read the Nova Scotia Pharmacare Formulary Updates here (Nova Scotia Lists EPCLUSA™ on P...

Louisiana proposes tapping a century-old patent law to cut hepatitis C drug prices

Continuing public concerns over high-priced hepatitis C drugs are taking a new twist as Louisiana’s top health official proposes using an obscure federal patent law to get the medicines at a much lower cost. If successful, other states could reap the benefits. Covering treatment for the 35,000 uninsured and Medicaid-dependent residents with hepatitis C would cost the state $764 million given current drug costs, a staggering sum that would have to be pulle