The Week in Review: July 27 – August 24, 2018

Friday, August 24, 2018 News Recap: Neuropsychiatric symptoms in hepatitis C patients resemble those of patients with autoimmune liver disease but are different from those in hepatitis B patients. Chronic fatigue, mood alterations and cognitive impairment are frequent accessory symptoms of HCV-infection. Fatigue and mood alterations have also been observed in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), but not in hepatitis B vi...

Drop in Aussies seeking hepatitis C cure

"Australia is one of the few countries where we can actually eliminate hepatitis C as a public health threat." Three months after starting medication to treat hepatitis C Frank Carlus was cured of the disease that claimed his mother's life. He describes the cure as a godsend, but for his mother the stigma associated with a disease often linked to risky lifestyles was a barrier to her seeking treatment. Hepatitis C can cause liver cancer, cirrhosis a...

The Week in Review: February 9 – February 16, 2018

Friday, February 16, 2018 News Recap: HCV & Heart Disease: Evolving Recognition of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection as a Modifiable Risk Factor for CVD. This article examines the evidence for clinical and subclinical cardiovascular diseases in chronic hepatitis c infection, as well as the effect of treatment on cardiovascular outcomes. News from Around the World: NZ: Thousands of Hepatitis C sufferers unaware a cure is within reach. A Hepatitis...

Hepatitis C drugs not being accessed by thousands of Australians with the disease

Hundreds of thousands of Australians with hepatitis C are failing to access new curative drugs, despite the Government subsidising them at huge cost to the taxpayer. The trend means the Government is at risk of missing its target to eradicate hepatitis C and of spending far more than necessary on the treatments. Hepatitis Australia said fewer than half as many people were accessing the direct acting antivirals as they were immediately after they were f

The Week in Review: April 28, 2017 – May 5, 2017

Friday, May 5, 2017 News Recap Canada Great news from Nova Scotia: Expanded access to and coverage for treatment of chronic hepatitis C is now available under the provincial Pharmacare plan, similar to the new arrangements in BC, Alberta, Ontario, Saskatchewan and Quebec.  The drugs covered are: Epclusa, Daklinza, Sunvepra, Zepatier, Harvoni and Sovaldi. You can read the Nova Scotia Pharmacare Formulary Updates here (Nova Scotia Lists EPCLUSA™ on P...

Lotus Glen is Australia’s first hepatitis C-free prison

LOTUS Glen Correctional Centre has become the first prison in Australia to be free of hepatitis C. The Tablelands based jail recently passed the milestone after introducing new medications to treat the infectious blood borne virus, which only became available early last year. Hepatitis C attacks the liver, causing its inflammation, and can lead to cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease, and liver cancer. In Australia, the sharing of drug injecti...

How new hepatitis C drugs could tackle liver cancer, too

How to cut rates of liver cancer? Reducing hepatitis C rates would be a good start. Wider availability of newer hepatitis C drugs may not only lead to fewer cases of this blood-borne disease, but may also slow the rise in related liver cancer. But these so-called direct acting antiviral drugs have not been widely available in Australia or overseas for long enough for us to confirm this long-term trend. So, we need to see if their increased use is li

Aust on target to eliminate hep C by 2026

More than 30,000 hepatitis C patients in Australia have been treated with revolutionary drugs since their listing on the PBS in March last year. Australia is on target to eliminate hepatitis C within 10 years due to the rapid uptake of a curative antiviral treatment program since its listing on the pharmaceutical benefits scheme (PBS) a year ago. A Kirby Institute report released on Tuesday supports predictions made by doctors last year that the in

Australia: Murray Bridge trials hepatitis C treatment project

Murray Bridge could be the first city in the world to eliminate hepatitis C when it hosts a national pilot project this March. Hepatitis SA are bringing a new revolution of treatment for the chronic disease to town in the effort to stop the spread of viral hepatitis worldwide by 2030. Despite an unprecedented number of Australians being cured of the disease in the past year, treatment uptake has proven slower in rural and regional areas. Murray Brid

Australia leading world in hepatitis C treatment; but disease more prevalent in Aboriginal people

More people are on track to be cured of hepatitis C in Australia this year than over the past two decades combined, new research has shown. A University of New South Wales Kirby Institute report shows about 230,000 people were living with hepatitis C across the country last year, but only one in five received treatment. Hepatitis C is transferred by blood-to-blood contact and is often spread by sharing drug injecting equipment. An oral anti-viral tr