The Week in Review: January 26 – February 2, 2018

Friday, February 2, 2018 News Recap: From the Uh-Oh Department: HCV Can Reactivate with Treatment of Non-hepatic Cancer. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reactivation occurred in approximately 1 out of 5 patients treated for non-hepatic cancer, posing renewed risk for hepatic injury and possibly complicating the cancer treatment. Compensation Update: Compensation – New Update for 86-90 Late Claims. If you or a family member received a blood transfusion o...

HCV Can Reactivate with Treatment of Non-hepatic Cancer

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reactivation to occur in approximately 1 out of 5 patients treated for non-hepatic cancer, posing renewed risk for hepatic injury and possibly complicating the cancer treatment. Comment: The definition of HCV reactivation (below)* is not what I would think, but it is the term accepted in the medical community.  They are NOT referring to a post-SVR reactivation.  If SVR is true then the virus is completely gone and cannot reactivate

Twenty Percent of New Cancer Treatments Do Not Offer a Clinical Benefit

While cancer drugs approved between 2003 and 2013 often improved quality of life, the average overall survival increase was only 3.43 months, and many drugs reduced patient safety, according to an article published in JAMA Oncology.1 It is often unclear whether a particular cancer treatment is worth the costs associated with its development and distribution. Overall survival is the standard measure by which a drug's efficacy is determined, and drug approv