SVR reduces hepatic venous pressure gradient, portal hypertension persists

Sustained virologic response correlated with reduced hepatic venous pressure gradient in patients with HCV-associated cirrhosis, according to a recently published study. However, clinically significant portal hypertension continued to persist in most patients. “Development of [clinically significant portal hypertension] is a hallmark in the natural history of cirrhosis because it is associated with a higher risk of hepatic decompensation, and increased ri

The Week in Review: October 6 – October 13, 2017

Friday, October 13, 2017 News Recap: Research & Discoveries After an intense hunt, researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) can now describe an important part of the disease's guerrilla tactics: how hepatitis C converts innocent cells into outright virus factories.  How hepatitis C hides in the body. Apparently, liver cancer can be caught at an early stage through a newly developed blood test, improving the odd...

Hospice care may come too late for patients with chronic liver disease

Patients with chronic liver disease, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease and chronic hepatitis C, had significantly longer hospital length of stay, annual health care charges and shorter hospice length of stay compared with other patients, according to recently published data. “Although many experts have advocated for the expansion of hospice care to persons dying of all chronic illnesses including those patients without canc

The Week in Review: September 22 – September 29, 2017

Friday, September 29, 2017 News Recap: Merck discontinues HCV programs. There were rumours, but now it’s official: Merck has announced that it will discontinue the development of the investigational combination regimens MK-3682B (grazoprevir/ruzasvir/uprifosbuvir) and MK-3682C (ruzasvir/uprifosbuvir) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In a statement the company said the decision was made based on a review of available Pha...

The Week in Review: September 15 – September 22, 2017

Friday, September 22, 2017 News Recap: Access to Treatment: This was a good week in terms of treatment access (but not, unfortunately, in terms of weather or seismic activity: How very, very sad).  Imagine being sick or on treatment in one of these stricken areas! In Canada Epclusa was approved for use in persons co-infected with HIV. This is very good news. Gilead Receives Approval in Canada for Expanded Indication of EPCLUSA® (Sofosbuvir/Velpat...

In HBV, high core-related antigen levels predict cirrhosis

Elevated hepatitis B virus core-related antigen levels significantly increased the risk for progression to cirrhosis among patients with chronic hepatitis B who are hepatitis B e antigen-negative and are not receiving nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy, according to recently published data. “Recently, various indices of liver fibrosis based on clinical and biological data have been reported to be useful predictors of fibrosis in liver disease,” Toshifumi Tada

The Week in Review: September 1 – September 8, 2017

Friday, September 8, 2017 News Recap: She thought her mystery ailment was cancer, but bloodwork revealed a surprise This is an amazing story ...but it could happen to anyone, and we know this because we hear these kinds of stories often. This is why it is so important that Boomers be tested for hepatitis C. Gail Wells got really sick and nobody could figure out why. They looked for cancer, for multiple sclerosis, for vitamin deficiencies, and then s...

Fibrosis Faster Among Men With HCV, Study Finds

Analysis aims to stratify progression among infected Banff, Canada—In chronic hepatitis C infection, longer duration of infection and genotype 1 infection are independently associated with slower progression of disease, according to researchers in Canada. Their meta-analysis—an update of the group’s 2008 study—also revealed that male sex and blood transfusion are associated with faster progression. “We need better estimates of disease progression in

The Week in Review: August 11 – August 18, 2017

Friday, August 18, 2017 Canada Great news in Canada. Two new drug regimens have been approved:  Vosevi from Gilead is a pangenotypic for retreatment of those who have failed previous DAA therapy Gilead Receives Approval in Canada for VOSEVI™ (Sofosbuvir/Velpatasvir/Voxilaprevir) for Re-treatment of Certain Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection. And MAVIRET from AbbVie is the first and only 8-week, pan-genotypic treatment for hepatit...

Steatosis: An Independent Risk Factor for Fibrosis in Chronic HCV

Steatosis is an independent risk factor for fibrosis in African-Americans with chronic HCV infection. A study recently published in Digestive Disease Science found that hypertension, older age, obesity, and HIV are risk factors and that steatosis is an independent risk factor for liver fibrosis in African-Americans with chronic hepatitis C. "Our retrospective study showed that there are risk factors, such as HIV coinfection for progression of liver fib