The Week in Review: October 27 – November 4, 2017

Friday, November 4, 2017 News Recap: Access to Treatment Hepatitis C could be eliminated in Canada, but drug prices, screening barriers stand in the way – Most of the 70 million patients infected with hepatitis C worldwide could be cured for $50 US each Many countries — including Canada — have committed to a global goal of eliminating hepatitis C by 2030. But new data released at the summit in Brazil shows that only nine countries are on track to me...

MSF secures lower price for generic hepatitis C treatment

Dramatic price drops should allow countries to provide treatment for millions of people On the eve of the World Hepatitis Summit in Sao Paolo, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has announced that it has secured deals for generic hepatitis C medicines for as low as US$1.40 per day, or $120 per 12-week treatment course for the key medicines sofosbuvir and daclatasvir. In the US, pharmaceutical corporation Gilead launched sofosbuvir at $1,000 per pill in 201

MSF joins Europe-wide action challenging patent on key hepatitis C drug

Rome/Geneva, – Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has today filed a patent challenge on the hepatitis C drug sofosbuvir with the European Patient Office (EPO) in an effort to increase access to affordable hepatitis C treatment. MSF has joined Médecins du Monde (MdM) and other civil society organisations from 17 countries in simultaneously filing patent challenges on the pharmaceutical corporation Gilead’s monopoly on sofosbuvir, in a bid to remove the barrier

Hepatitis C Patent Challenges In India, Argentina To Allow Generic Production

Resistance to high prices for hepatitis C drugs is ongoing as five new challenges against patents have been filed in India and Argentina, according to sources. Those challenges aim at allowing the production and distribution of affordable generic versions of new hepatitis C medicines (direct-acting antivirals). According to a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF, Doctors Without Borders) press release, on 13 February the Initiative for Medicines, Access & Kn

Doctors Without Borders urges Gilead to rethink its hepatitis C strategy in Ukraine

The latest battle over access to medicines is taking place in Ukraine, where Doctors Without Borders is urging Gilead Sciences to drop a court action that, if successful, would prevent a generic version of the Sovaldi hepatitis C treatment from remaining available. In a Sept. 5 letter released publicly Tuesday, Gilead was asked to “reconsider its business strategy in high-burden, middle-income countries, especially Ukraine,” since its strategies “threaten

All You Need to Know: September’s Crucial Verdict on the Sofosbuvir Patent Saga

The patent also covers the raw materials to make the drugs, which means it would allow the manufacturer to disrupt exports of the raw materials from India. In September, India will witness the first hearing in a crucial court case on the grant of a patent for the anti-hepatitis-C drug sofosbuvir – a drug whose patent was rejected and then approved by the same patent court, albeit by two different officials. A recent report of the international medical cha

Gilead gets patent for Hepatitis C drug Sovaldi

The decision is a major blow to the access to drug movement, says MSF In direct contradiction to its earlier order, the Controller General of Patents, Designs and Trademark granted American pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences the patent for the blockbuster Hepatitis C drug Sofosbuvir (brand name Sovaldi) in India. An application for the same patent was first rejected in January 2015 as lacking inventiveness and novelty. On Monday, however, the pa...

Patent Challenge Hearing on Gilead Hepatitis C Drug Sofosbuvir Starts in India

New York/New Delhi—In proceedings that could have major implications for millions of people waiting for affordable access to a lifesaving hepatitis C drug, the Indian Patent Office this week began hearings to determine whether US pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences deserves a patent for sofosbuvir, a hepatitis C drug for which the company currently charges $1,000 per pill in the US.Today’s hearings are in relation to a "patent opposition" filed by lawye