The Week in Review: September 29 – October 6, 2017

Friday, October 6, 2017 News Recap: Liver Cancer Two studies on liver cancer in the news last week highlighted the global prevalence and causes of this terrible disease.  The first showed a direct correlation between excess weight and cancer occurrence (including liver cancer) – Cancers linked to excess weight make up 40% of all US diagnoses, study finds, while the second focussed on the global incidence of primary liver cancer. Hepatitis B virus wa...

Liver cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide

Primary liver cancer incidence increased by 75% between 1990 and 2015, and the disease remains one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world, according to a report from the Global Burden of Diseases Study 2015. Further, hepatitis B virus was the leading cause of new cases of liver cancer in 2015, the research showed. The highest rates of liver cancer incidence, disability-adjusted life-years and mortality occurred in East Asia. Japan had 75% o

The Week in Review: September 22 – September 29, 2017

Friday, September 29, 2017 News Recap: Merck discontinues HCV programs. There were rumours, but now it’s official: Merck has announced that it will discontinue the development of the investigational combination regimens MK-3682B (grazoprevir/ruzasvir/uprifosbuvir) and MK-3682C (ruzasvir/uprifosbuvir) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In a statement the company said the decision was made based on a review of available Pha...

People of Mexican descent in US have more liver cancer risk factors than those living in Mexico

Mexican-Americans living in the United States demonstrated more risk factors for liver cancer than their counterparts in Mexico, according to results of a study presented at the 10th AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held here Sept. 25-28. "Liver cancer incidence and mortality have been on the rise in the United States, despite a steady decline in overall cancer incidence

U.S.: CDC – New Hepatitis C Infections Nearly Tripled Over Five Years

Deadly virus concentrated among baby boomers and increasing rapidly among new generations of Americans Over just five years, the number of new hepatitis C virus infections reported to CDC has nearly tripled, reaching a 15-year high, according to new preliminary surveillance data released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Because hepatitis C has few symptoms, nearly half of people living with the virus don’t know they are in

First U.S. state-by-state analysis of hepatitis C cases

In the infectious disease world, the liver-damaging hepatitis C virus (HCV) long has lived in the shadows of killers such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. But curative—and expensive—HCV drugs that have come to market over the past 5 years have focused new attention on the deadly disease. Now, for the first time, researchers have mapped its U.S. prevalence state-by-state. They hope their model ultimately will help improve targeting of efforts to s...

HCV Screening Shouldn’t Just Focus on At-Risk Populations

At the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) in Seattle, Washington, researchers from MedStar Health Research Institute in Maryland presented new data on hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive non-baby boomers. It’s widely acknowledged that those individuals belonging to the baby boomer age group (those born between 1946 and 1964) are at higher risk of acquiring HCV infection. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Preven

U.S.: Doctors, health officials want broad testing for hepatitis C

The Iowa Department of Public Health is calling for widespread testing for hepatitis C after a study showed cases in Iowa have almost tripled since 2000. Data shows the number of Iowans diagnosed with the hepatitis C virus increased from 754 in 2000 to 2,235 in 2015, a press release from department stated. The number of diagnoses among Iowans between 18 and 30 years old more than quadrupled since 2009, with 303 cases alone in 2015. After taking into ac

Cirrhosis Increasing Among Hepatitis C Patients, According to Large US Study

The past decade has seen a nearly 40 percent increase in the prevalence of cirrhosis among people with hepatitis C in the U.S., a new study found. The reasons remain uncertain, however. The study, titled “Hepatitis C Complications: Prevalence and Disparities in a Large US Cohort 2006-2014” (abstract #180) was presented at The Liver Meeting 2016, held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD). Cirrhosis has long been linked t

Rise in known Hepatitis C cases possibly due to improved screening

Hepatitis C might be on the rise locally, according to a new report from the Chatham-Kent Public Health Unit. Part of the problem comes from a reluctance to seek help based on the slow progression of the disease. At Wednesday’s Board of Health meeting, the 2015 infectious disease report was presented by the health unit’s epidemiologist, Stanley Ing, and its program manager of clinic services, Stacy Rybansky. Three infectious diseases saw their numbers