Growing Evidence Shows Hepatitis C Intersects With Other Diseases

As many as three-quarters of individuals with hepatitis C virus (HCV) experience disorders related to the virus beyond the impact on their livers, the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable estimates. HCV-related kidney disease, depression, skin disorders, lymphoma and other conditions can seriously impact a patient, even without severe damage to the liver, studies have shown. There’s also growing evidence as to how HCV intersects with other disease states,

The Week in Review: October 13 – October 20, 2017

Friday, October 20, 2017 News Recap: Disease Management: Women: Hepatitis C in pregnancy: screening, treatment, and management. Hepatitis C (HCV) during pregnancy is associated with serious, adverse outcomes. Infants born to women with HCV are more likely to experience fetal growth restriction and low birth weight. For women, chronic HCV is associated with progressive liver damage and, during pregnancy, can be transmitted from the mother to the fe...

Hepatitis C and the Rheumatologist: Our Role in the Quest for Global Eradication of HCV

I am pleased to have Healio Rheumatology focus this issue’s Cover Story on the intersection of viral hepatitis and rheumatology, as this is a subject both near to my heart as well as one of great importance to many patients. Our esteemed sources enlighten us on many aspects of the impact of viral hepatitis and rheumatic diseases from not only from the perspective of these viruses as etiologies for many rheumatic syndromes, but also, and far more important,

Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C: Screening and Management: a podcast by Jordan J. Feld, MD, MPH and Joel S. Emery, HBSc, MD

Listen for FREE to excellent podcast by Canadian physicians JORDAN FELD, MD, MPH and JOEL S. EMERY, HBSc, MD about EXTRAHEPATIC MANIFESTATIONS of Hepatitis C Screening and Management (32 minutes): "Extrahepatic manifestations (EHM) of hepatitis C have significant impacts on both morbidity and mortality over and above the contributions of liver disease. Fortunately, early recognition and treatment may reduce permanent disability and improve long-term progn

The Week in Review: Sep 23 – 30, 2016

Friday, September-30-16 HCV Infection Increases Extrahepatic Mortality This month the eViralHepatitis Review from Johns Hopkins University devoted a whole issue to Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C: Screening and Management. Because HCV is typically considered a primary infection of the liver, its eradication is thought to result in health benefits primarily from improved hepatic outcomes, with most literature supporting reductions in the...

HCV Infection Increases Extrahepatic Mortality

Because HCV is typically considered a primary infection of the liver, its eradication is thought to result in health benefits primarily from improved hepatic outcomes, with most literature supporting reductions in the development of cirrhosis and its complications.1 The paradigm that HCV is a liver disease and mortality is driven by liver-related complications has guided clinical decision-making, and more recently, reimbursement criteria.1,2 However, HCV i

Research shows hepatitis C is associated with increased risk of heart disease

The University of Arkansas scientists announced that hepatitis 'C' is associated with an increased risk of heart disease."The link between chronic infections and atherosclerotic heart disease has been well described. Hepatitis C is a common infection affecting more than 150 million people globally. We wanted to see if active infection with hepatitis C increases the risk of developing heart disease," said principal investigator, Dr. Naga V Pothineni MD at t

Hepatitis C Virus Infection Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

Approximately 130 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Although HCV primarily damages the liver, infection also causes multiple extrahepatic manifestations, including elicitation of autoimmune reaction, deposition of immune complexes and/or lymphoproliferation. Some patients develop arthritis, and many patients with HCV-related polyarthritis also meet the American College of Rheumatology criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA)