The Week in Review: January 26 – February 2, 2018

Friday, February 2, 2018 News Recap: From the Uh-Oh Department: HCV Can Reactivate with Treatment of Non-hepatic Cancer. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reactivation occurred in approximately 1 out of 5 patients treated for non-hepatic cancer, posing renewed risk for hepatic injury and possibly complicating the cancer treatment. Compensation Update: Compensation – New Update for 86-90 Late Claims. If you or a family member received a blood transfusion o...

Deaths from liver cancer nearly double since the 1990s, new figures reveal

World Hepatitis Alliance Press Release – Over the last two decades, deaths caused by liver cancer have increased by 80%, making it one of the fastest-growing causes of cancer deaths worldwide. According to the Global Burden of Disease Study, the most comprehensive worldwide observational epidemiological study to date, 830,000 people died as a result of the disease in 2016 compared to 464,000 people in 1990. This makes liver cancer the second leading cause

Viral hepatitis kills more people than HIV, malaria or tuberculosis

World Hepatitis Alliance calls for immediate political action to counteract fatal trend [London, 14 September] According to the Global Burden of Disease study released today, deaths caused by viral hepatitis have surpassed all chronic infectious diseases including HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. The study illustrates that in 2016, the total deaths caused by viral hepatitis, including liver cancer, acute cases, cirrhosis, hepatitis A, E, B, C and ...

Just 20% of people living with hep C are aware of their status

WHO's hepatitis report reveals global impact of the disease. Awareness and education around hepatitis remain poor, with just 20% of people living with hep C aware of their status after getting tested, according to a new report. The World Health Organization’s first-of-its-kind investigation of the global hepatitis situation also found that only 9% of people living with hepatitis B knew they were affected. Between them the two strains account for 96% of

Cases of hepatitis B and C hit 325 million: WHO

An estimated 325 million people are living with hepatitis B or C and few are aware of their condition, with death tolls from the viruses rising, the UN said Friday. The World Health Organization's latest hepatitis report identifies the condition as a grave public health threat that needs an "urgent response." Hepatitis killed 1.34 million people in 2015, a toll roughly in-line with HIV and tuberculosis. But in contrast to HIV and TB, hepatitis death