The Week in Review: October 27 – November 4, 2017

Friday, November 4, 2017 News Recap: Access to Treatment Hepatitis C could be eliminated in Canada, but drug prices, screening barriers stand in the way – Most of the 70 million patients infected with hepatitis C worldwide could be cured for $50 US each Many countries — including Canada — have committed to a global goal of eliminating hepatitis C by 2030. But new data released at the summit in Brazil shows that only nine countries are on track to me...

Curing hepatitis C with DAAs linked to 71% reduction in liver cancer

People who achieved a sustained response to hepatitis C treatment lowered their risk of hepatocellular carcinoma by around 70%, regardless of whether they were treated with new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) or older interferon-based therapy, according to study results presented at the 2017 AASLD Liver Meeting last week in Washington, DC. "It doesn’t matter how you eradicate hepatitis C, you get a similar reduction in liver cancer," George Ioannou of the

The Week in Review: August 11 – August 18, 2017

Friday, August 18, 2017 Canada Great news in Canada. Two new drug regimens have been approved:  Vosevi from Gilead is a pangenotypic for retreatment of those who have failed previous DAA therapy Gilead Receives Approval in Canada for VOSEVI™ (Sofosbuvir/Velpatasvir/Voxilaprevir) for Re-treatment of Certain Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection. And MAVIRET from AbbVie is the first and only 8-week, pan-genotypic treatment for hepatit...

How Do Direct-Acting Antivirals for Hepatitis C Affect the Risk for Hepatocellular Carcinoma?

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which has an annual incidence rate of 1%-4%, is a potential complication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) cirrhosis owing to a multistep carcinogenesis pathway. Previous HCV treatment with interferon was associated with poor cure rates and was limited to individuals with early fibrosis or well-compensated cirrhosis. Such therapy, however, also led to a decrease in HCC after a sustained viral response (SVR). Although remarkable pro