The Week in Review: July 14 – July 21, 2017

Friday, July 21, 2017 News Recap 1) Vosevi Approved in US – Under Review in Canada Vosevi has just been approved in the USA to treat adults with chronic HCV genotypes 1-6 without cirrhosis (liver disease) or with mild cirrhosis. Vosevi is a fixed-dose, combination tablet containing sofosbuvir, velpatasvir and a new drug, voxilaprevir. Vosevi is the first treatment approved for patients who have been previously treated with DAAs and failed treatment....

500,000 Malaysian have hepatitis C — they just don’t know it yet

KUALA LUMPUR — It is estimated that about 500,000 Malaysians have Hepatitis C, but most of them are unaware of their infection, said the country’s Health Minister Dr S Subramaniam. Calling it a major challenge in the medical field, he said Hepatitis C incidence rates saw an increase from 3.71 per cent in 2009 to 8.57 per cent in 2016. "However, we must also be cognizant of the fact that the figures obtained from the Health Ministry may be an underestim

Hepatitis C: New Drugs Cure It, but Most People Don’t Know They Have It

Hepatitis C is a potentially deadly liver disease that affects an estimated 3.5 million people in the United States and up to 150 million worldwide. In fact, it kills more Americans than all other infectious diseases together! But in just the past few years, advances in treatment have been nothing short of astounding. A condition once treated with medication that caused serious side effects and delivered a low cure rate is now curable almost all of the t...

Just 20% of people living with hep C are aware of their status

WHO's hepatitis report reveals global impact of the disease. Awareness and education around hepatitis remain poor, with just 20% of people living with hep C aware of their status after getting tested, according to a new report. The World Health Organization’s first-of-its-kind investigation of the global hepatitis situation also found that only 9% of people living with hepatitis B knew they were affected. Between them the two strains account for 96% of

Current hepatitis C virus testing guidelines miss too many cases, study suggest

Urban emergency departments a good place to enact universal screening for adults Johns Hopkins Medicine A review of blood samples for nearly 5,000 patients seen at The Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Department suggests that federal guidelines for hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening may be missing up to a quarter of all cases and argues for updated universal screening. A report on the study is published online ahead of print in the journal Clinic