The Week in Review: January 26 – February 2, 2018

Friday, February 2, 2018 News Recap: From the Uh-Oh Department: HCV Can Reactivate with Treatment of Non-hepatic Cancer. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reactivation occurred in approximately 1 out of 5 patients treated for non-hepatic cancer, posing renewed risk for hepatic injury and possibly complicating the cancer treatment. Compensation Update: Compensation – New Update for 86-90 Late Claims. If you or a family member received a blood transfusion o...

Viral suppression protects against long-term liver damage caused by older HIV drugs

Most people living with HIV now have a normal life expectancy as a consequence of effective antiretroviral treatment, and viral suppression with modern therapies has been shown to have a beneficial effect on liver health. Liver disease remains a leading cause of serious illness and death in people with HIV. Much of this can be attributed to co-infection with HCV and/or hepatitis B virus (HBV), or problematic alcohol use. It is well known that older, and n

McGill study finds people infected with HIV more likely to develop fatty liver

Fatty liver is among the most frequent causes of liver disease in Canada and in Western countries and is one of the main indications for liver transplant. For some time, researchers have suspected that people living with HIV could be at higher risk of developing liver disease, which, as a result of longer life expectancy thanks to antiretroviral therapy, has become the major cause of their mortality in North America. Due to the invasiveness of liver biops

HCV reinfection common in MSM with HIV

In a retrospective study, researchers found that hepatitis C virus reinfection is common among HIV-positive men who have sex with men after successful treatment and spontaneous clearance. “A subsequent high incidence of HCV reinfection has been reported regionally in men who both clear the infection spontaneously or who respond to treatment. … An accurate description of the HCV epidemic including a concise observation of reinfections in specific populatio