Treating patients for hepatitis C could reduce the need for liver transplants

Patients with severe liver damage and hepatitis C virus comprise 30 percent of adults on the liver transplant waiting list European Association for the Study of the Liver April 14, 2016, Barcelona, Spain: A new study presented today demonstrates that patients on the liver transplant list with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and severe liver damage were more likely to be taken off the list or have their need of a liver transplant reduced as a result of direct-act

AbbVie hepatitis C combo shows high cure rates

AbbVie presented new data on its once-daily hepatitis C virus (HCV) combination, revealing high cure rates across all six major HCV genotypes. The new phase II data on NS3/4A protease inhibitor ABT-493 and NS5A inhibitor ABT-530 - which recently started pivotal trials - showed that 97-98% of patients with genotype 1-3 HCV and no cirrhosis achieved a cure (sustained virologic response or SVR) within eight weeks of starting treatment. Meanwhile, in paten

Generic Hepatitis C Drugs as Effective as Pricey Brand Names: Study

SATURDAY, April 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low-cost generic antiviral drugs are as effective and safe as more expensive brand-name drugs in treating people with hepatitis C, researchers report. In many countries, people don't have access to a course of brand-name direct-acting antiviral drugs due to the high cost -- as much as $94,000 a patient, the researchers explained. However, mass-produced generic versions are available for less than 1 percent...

New triple drug combination shows promise in hepatitis C infected patients

High sustained virologic response achieved with sofosbuvir/velpatasvir and GS-9857, even in patients unsuccessfuly treated with direct-acting antivirals European Association for the Study of the Liver April 14, 2016, Barcelona, Spain: New data presented today at The International Liver Congress™ 2016 in Barcelona, Spain, demonstrates a high sustained virologic response (SVR) at 12 weeks from the all-oral combination of sofosbuvir/velpatasvir and ex

Hep C ‘viral time bomb’ can be defused, says doctor who set up real-life Dallas Buyers Club operation

It is financially feasible to defuse the hepatitis C "viral time bomb" affecting 150 million people worldwide, an international conference will hear on Saturday. The disease is one of the five major causes of infectious illness deaths in the world, along with malaria, TB, HIV, and hepatitis B. It kills 500,000 people a year, the World Health Organisation estimates, and prevents millions more from leading productive lives. Yet, only one in 300 of thos...