The Week in Review: Oct 26 – Nov 2, 2018

Friday, Nov 2, 2018 News Recap: Report on the Pacific AIDS Network (PAN) 2018 Fall Conference in Kelowna The Pacific AIDS Network held its annual Fall Conference and AGM October 30-31 in Kelowna. HepCBC attended this year for the first time as a Full Member, due to changes in the PAN Constitution and Bylaws. New Bylaws included: PAN no longer requires its hepatitis C organizational members to offer HIV-related services. Aging and Viral Hepatitis ...

Potential markers identified for early detection and prevention of liver cancer

Liver cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, claiming 700,000 lives each year. Most cases are discovered too late for a cure—but now a study offers hope of early detection, and targets for new treatments. Published in Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, the results show a dramatic increase in expression of sugar-burning 'glycolytic' enzymes in precancerous cirrhotic livers. This increase is associated with a sign

The Week in Review: Oct 19 – Oct 26, 2018

Friday, Oct 26, 2018 News Recap: HepCBC Annual General Meeting INVITATION TO ALL We invite everyone to have a say in the direction of HepCBC, a BC-wide patient advocacy group confronting Viral Hepatitis since 1996, through participation in our upcoming Annual General Meeting (AGM) – either in person or online! 7th Annual Liver Forum 2018 in Vancouver! On October 19th, Volunteers Douglas Laird and Cheryl Reitz of HepCBC attended the exciting 7th ...

Interleukin IL-22, a new target to inhibit the progression of liver disease

Montreal, October 26, 2018 - Naglaa Shoukry, Ph. D., and her team have made a significant breakthrough in their research aiming to limit the progression of liver disease. They have characterized the mechanisms of action of type 3 inflammatory cytokines that are produced by the cells of the immune system, which result in a progression of hepatic scarring known as fibrosis. These research efforts have identified new potential targets to inhibit the progressi

The Week in Review: June 15 – June 22, 2018

Friday, June 22, 2018 News Recap: Canada: All Kids Should Have a Hepatitis B Shot. Clinicians and researchers attending an international conference say all Canadian children should be vaccinated against hepatitis B starting at birth to prevent the development of potentially deadly liver disease later in life, a policy recommended by the World Health Organization. Currently, most provinces and territories immunize children against the liver-destroyin...

Researchers find a promising new approach for treating liver cirrhosis

A study in The American Journal of Pathology, investigators report that treatment with aleglitazar, a dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha/gamma (PPARα/γ) agonist, reduced inflammation, vasoconstriction, angiogenesis, mucosal disruption, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α overproduction in cirrhotic rats with PH. This suggests a promising new approach for treating liver cirrhosis. Increased pressure in the veins leading to the liver, known

The Week in Review: June 8 – June 15, 2018

Friday, June 15, 2018 News Recap: Canada: Canada is facing a tsunami of liver disease and cancer: U of T expert – The Conversation with U of T's Dr. Morris Sherman. Deaths from liver cancer in Canada have doubled over the past 25 years. And to make matters worse, there’s an epidemic of liver cancer on the horizon if action isn’t taken soon. While less people are dying from most major cancers – such as breast cancer and lung cancer – liver cancer (...

Lungs from deceased donors with hepatitis C can be safely transplanted: researchers

Toronto doctors have successfully transplanted lungs from deceased donors with hepatitis C into patients in need of the life-saving organs, followed by treatment to prevent them from becoming infected with the potentially liver-destroying virus. Since October, surgeons at Toronto General Hospital have performed the transplants in 11 patients as part of a pilot study to evaluate the safety of using lungs from hepatitis C-infected donors — a previously unte

The Week in Review: June 1 – June 8, 2018

Friday, June 8, 2018 News Recap: Canada: New guidelines recommend hepatitis C screening be done for those born between 1945 and 1975. The Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver (CASL), a national group of health-care providers and researchers, published its guidelines on testing and treating hepatitis C in Monday's edition of the CMAJ. Canadians born between 1945 and 1975 – essentially the baby-boom generation – should be tested for the pot...

Findings could lead to treatment of hepatitis B

Researchers at the University of Delaware, working with colleagues at Indiana University, have gained new insights into the virus that causes hepatitis B -- a life-threatening and incurable infection that afflicts more than 250 million people worldwide. The discovery, which was published April 27 in the journal eLife, reveals previously unknown details about the capsid, or protein shell, that encloses the virus' genetic blueprint. Scientists believe th