Ontario: ‘I hope everybody has access to it’: Province to start paying for hep C drugs

The Ontario government has significantly increased the number of people who can be cured of this potentially fatal, liver-destroying virus by adding some expensive new drugs to its Ontario Public Drug Programs and expanding eligibility to people whose livers aren’t as severely damaged. Many people who need the treatment would be eligible for an Ontario drug program either because they’re over 65, they’re receiving disability or they have very low incomes.

The Week in Review: Feb 17, 2017 – Feb 24, 2017

Friday, February 24, 2017 News Recap Better Public Access to New HepC Meds Announced in Canada This week the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance (pCPA), on behalf of participating federal, provincial and territorial public drug plans, concluded successful negotiations with three drug manufacturers to help jurisdictions expand access to publicly funded medications for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. What this Means: Immediately following th...

‘No One Left Behind!’ — Update from Pacific Hepatitis C Network on Recent PharmaCare Developments

Pacific Hepatitis C Network is very happy to learn that effective March 21, an extensive list of hepatitis C treatments will be available through BC PharmaCare – at far better prices than they previously had been. The high cost of hepatitis C treatment has effectively restricted the numbers of people living with hepatitis C who could access treatment. Even with lower prices, those restrictions will remain in place until next year. Come March 2018, those r

More patients to benefit from hepatitis C treatments

Thousands of British Columbians living with hepatitis C will have better access to treatment as a result of successful negotiations brokered by the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance (pCPA). “This agreement changes the landscape for hepatitis C patients living in B.C.,” said Health Minister Terry Lake. “Not only are there four new treatment options for what is now a curable virus, but the savings that were negotiated will allow us to cover treatment opt

A Statement from the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance

TORONTO, Feb. 21, 2017 /CNW/ - On behalf of participating federal, provincial and territorial public drug plans, the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance (pCPA) has concluded successful negotiations with three drug manufacturers to help jurisdictions expand access to publicly funded medications for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is a communicable liver disease that is caused by an infection with the hepatitis C virus. Seventy-five per c

Colorado board recommends expanded coverage for hepatitis C drug

ACLU threatens lawsuit over coverage policy A state board recommended Tuesday night that more needy Coloradans receive potentially curative treatments for hepatitis C. But the board stopped short of recommending that the treatments — new drugs that have been shown to have a 90 percent cure rate — be extended to all Coloradans on Medicaid. And that means the American Civil Liberties Union may file a federal lawsuit against the state to force it to provi

U.S.: Delaware lifts restrictions on who can qualify for hepatitis C treatment

Delaware is phasing out its restrictions on who can get newer, more effective hepatitis C treatments. The drugs are essentially a cure for a blood-borne disease that's a leading cause of liver failure in the United States. But the cost has put many states, including Delaware, in a fiscal bind. In 2014, Delaware spent nearly $2.5 million to treat 44 people; last year, it cost the state $13.5 million to treat 141 people. Stephen Groff, director of Del